How Can I Negotiate a Better Salary Offer?

read-more-only

How Can I Negotiate a Better Salary Offer?

-Signed, I just want what I deserve.

We all want what we deserve. Unfortunately, what I call the ‘Unwelcome Truth’ usually gets in the way.

The Unwelcome Truth:

Companies usually pay based on pay history, and they are not typically basing their offers on what you will bring to the company, or on what you will produce for them. That’s an equation that most individuals who strive to be at the top of their professions have a difficult time accepting. So, I have some advice.

Change the Equation.

Just knowing this ‘pay history’ fact will help you better prepare for your interview process (that’s a sales opportunity for you). The interview process –which may begin with an email exchange, a brief phone conversation to ‘pre-screen’ you for a role, or a scheduled full interview, is an opportunity for you to begin to properly frame your value to the organization that you are potentially looking to join.

At each step in the process, which may include multiple phone and multiple face-to-face interviews, it’s important to ‘control’ any conversation about salary, salary history, expected salary, desired salary, etc. Whether that question comes directly in a pre-screen phone call, as an off-handed question out-of-the-blue during one of your meetings, or as a question buried in a stack papers that someone from the Human Resources / HR department has handed you, you must stay in control of what you choose to communicate about your salary.

Here’s my guideline. On your current or last salary, if they ask, you will need to disclose it at some point, but wait as long as possible to do so. The last thing that you want to do early in the process is to create a number in their minds that they associate or identify when they think of you. Ideally, when they do think of you, you want them to be thinking of the value that you will bring and the addition in expertise that their team will gain, should they choose to hire you. Delaying any discussion with regards to salary will give you the ability to frame your value during the interview process by letting them know all that you will ‘bring to the table’ in this new position. If and when you do decide to disclose your past salary, you have to frame it as ‘$X for that role’, and then segue to the fact that for the role under consideration, you would be ‘looking for a fair offer for your experience and the responsibilities of that position’.

As for expected or desired salary, Never… and this is one of the rare cases where I really mean never, never answer the ‘expected or desired salary’ question with a number (any number). No, Nada, Never. Really.

First, you have to understand why they are asking. Have you bought a car in your past? The question could just as easily be about buying a house, a new TV or anything else that you may want to acquire. The person at the auto dealership asks you what you can afford or how much you want to spend. They are looking at the ‘deal’ from their side, but trying to convey that ‘it’s about you’. Hogwash. It’s about trying to work the deal so that you ‘feel’ satisfied and so that they get to sell / structure the deal with most of the advantage to them. So why do we so willingly tell them how much money we have to spend? Because they asked. Asking, is an important part of selling. Individuals involved in hiring are there to actually find the right person, but they are also there to ‘sell’ the opportunity to that individual –so that they want to join the company. We are all trained to answer too many questions, disarmed by an ease of style that may be present in the sales person’s approach.

The hiring process is a buy/sell relationship, just like any other. Ever wonder why –no one– is allowed, at any company that I have seen, to talk about or discuss their compensation with others in the company? An ‘open pricing’ policy on salaries would surely drive up overall wages, and that’s not to their advantage. It’s simply because five people all standing next to each other doing the same job are likely all earning different salaries. If 3 of the 5 knew what the other two were making, they would demand the same. You’ll see others comment in that this just ‘isn’t so’, but that’s what exists in many many companies and those that earn the most know all too well about this fact.

Given this understanding, there is an obvious reason why they are asking expected or desired salary. Just like the car salesperson, they would like to offer you the very least that they could. You may not be thrilled with their offer, but you will likely not be overly disappointed, as it will most certainly be an offer in the area of what you had told them was acceptable.

Take back Control.

Be sure to be selling them on all that you bring, while also evaluating whether this is the right company for your next career home. Work to have them see you as the solution to many of the issues and challenges that you discuss with regard to the role. And continue to reinforce that you would be looking for a fair offer for your experience and the responsibilities of that position. You can also turn the tables a little by asking them what they have budgeted for the role. If they can ask, why can’t you?

The interview process is your time to present and sell yourself, as compared to all others that they may see. Your value must be stronger, and brighter, than all of the other candidates. As you navigate the process, look for every opportunity to understand what their real problems are (it’s not the open position) and relate how your background, experience and expertise is the right solution for those problems.

In my book, Self-Recruiter® Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter & Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge, I discuss many of the challenges faced during the hiring process and how to overcome them. It’s about getting them to ‘fall in love’ with your skills and expertise for the role. That’s your job during the interview(s). Once they ‘have to have YOU’ for the position, the negotiations are no longer from a sorting, or ‘ruling out’ standpoint. They are about trying to come up with an offer to ‘make it work’ for both the company and the person they are trying to hire. And that’s a Win-Win for everyone.

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© 2009 John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

I’ve been unemployed for 10 months and I can’t seem to get hired. What am I doing wrong?

read-more-only

I’ve been unemployed for 10 months and I can’t seem to get hired. I’m even willing to take a step backward -to no avail. What am I doing wrong?

Signed,

–Struggling to Solve a Puzzle

When we face a long period of unemployment, many things happen to our self confidence, and the view we may have of professional selves. Of course, be sure to view my video about Suffering After a Layoff [ http://www.selfrecruiter.com/podcast1.html ], but even though you may put this layoff itself behind you, many things can still cloud our judgement as we analyze and go after each new opportunity that we uncover.

You had mentioned that you did have the opportunity for an interview, but that they had a concern over your potentially step backward from the director’s position which you had held, to an individual contributor’s role.

This concern is natural, and it’s an objection in every potential employer’s mind –whether they raise that concern during your interview –or not.

It may help you to understand what a hiring manager considers ‘a good hire’. There are many costs involved when an employer looks to hire an individual for a position that they are looking to fill. Benefit costs, training and orientation costs, costs associated with a ‘ramp-up’ period before the new employee truly begins contributing, not to mention the costs involved for the efforts to actually source the potential new-hire, and more. For many hiring managers, a ‘good hire’ starts with someone that is at the right ‘arc of their career’. This means… is the position at the ‘right level’ for your background, not simply ‘do you have interest and desire’ to be in the role.

Let’s look at my definition of a good hire:

A Good Hire is someone that I can hire, who will be:

(1) happy,

(2) contented, &

(3) challenged in the role; a role where they can

(4) continue to grow in their abilities; and over time

(5) can be promoted to the next level role where they will also be happy, contented, challenged and growing.

If I can keep this new-hire for a period of at least somewhere between 4–7 years before they move on to another employer… THAT’S a GOOD HIRE!

Now, that’s a tall bar to set for new-hires, as many individuals do get hired and then move on after only a short while or a year or two. Then I incur more expense to begin the process all over again to replace them. That’s where this ‘arc of your career’ thing comes into the decision process.

Let’s take your situation as an example. You were a director. Looking over your employment background and your credentials, you have had a nice career progression. That would raise a potential concern for any employer that would consider hiring you for a lesser role.

The questions circling in the hiring manager’s mind would be:

– Why would this individual stay happy and contented in the new (lesser) role?

– How could the individual be challenged in the new (lesser) role?

– What could they possibly learn in the new (lesser) role that would keep them growing?

– When I am ready to promote them in a couple years, it would just be to the same level that they had been at several years back at that point…

You can begin to understand the concerns, even if you don’t like to think about that part.

But all is not lost. When you consider what may be going on inside of a hiring managers mind, that presents a wonderful opportunity for you to address and overcome each one of those ‘objections’ that may be preventing them from moving you on to the next interview in their hiring process or to making you an offer.

I have coached and advised many individuals facing just such challenges with the specifics on overcoming those objections during the hiring process. And I’ve helped them to a successful conclusion  so that they understand how to get their careers back on track. I would recommend working closely with a career and interview coach, but be sure that they truly understand the real-world dynamics of the hiring process from every side and every angle.

You also mentioned another challenge that you face: getting more frequent interviews.

Maybe, it’s your RESUME.

In this case, I believe it is. Take a look at my video on Resume Renovation [ http://www.selfrecruiter.com/podcast4.html ]. Your resume that you had sent to me does not pass the ’3 second’ Resume Test and while it has a great many items of value on it, there are so many points to consider (it’s a 2-pager), that puts your value ‘out of focus’. My recommendation here is to engage someone that understands what may be ‘valuable’ and what is not –to help bring your value back into focus before you get ruled out at the resume ‘sorting’ stage of their hiring process for the jobs that you are pursuing.

Maybe, it’s your LinkedIn Profile.

Your LinkedIn Profile should be your own ‘Sales Brochure’ that helps build your credibility and your reputation.

Will your profile add to, or take away from others’ perceptions about you?

And will it show your true value and get you noticed?

That may be the difference in being considered for your next business or career opportunity and getting that next meeting or interview -or going unnoticed.

It’s a very small investment in yourself –when compared to each additional week that leaves you unable to find your next career home.

Resources for Help:

You can learn more about CAREER and INTERVIEW COACHING here:

http://www.selfrecruiter.com/services3.html

You can learn more about full-service RESUME RENOVATION here:

http://www.selfrecruiter.com/services2.html

Also, my book covers many topics and challenges when looking for your next career home.

Things like getting your resume noticed; getting that next interview; reaching out directly to hiring managers –not just to HR; negotiating a better salary and benefits; using the Internet resources available to you; planning for the unexpected during your interviews; avoiding the traps in the HR department; and how to manage your job search. Click the title below for more information on the book and audiobook:

Self-Recruiter®

Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &

Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.

.

Stay motived in your job search

–by Taking Control Back for Yourself.

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker
on Job Search and Career Management

© 2009 John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

My Annual Review is next week. How Can I get Something Else if They cannot Raise My Salary?

read-more-only

Q: My Annual Review is next week. How Can I get Something Else if They cannot Raise My Salary?

– Lone-Wolf Standing in My Department

Congratulation!

That may seem strange given the situation that you are describing of being the ‘last one standing’ in what was formerly a larger department. But, the congratulations are for not letting it stop you, or holding you back from going after SOMETHING during your Annual Review.

You had told me in your email that you didn’t think that they had the funds to give raises this year, even with all of the cutbacks. That may be true, or it may be untrue.

My advice is to go in with a positive attitude, ready to recount your contributions this year to the company –even if their ‘attitude’ conveys that they are worried about how you’ll take ‘not getting a raise’. Of course, I would always recommend that you do the work necessary to fully prepare for this meeting. Many individuals think of an annual review as a time for ‘them’ to to evaluate ‘us’. While that’s true, it’s also a time for you to be evaluating and communicating your accomplishments to them and your expectations to your supervisor. Remember, they are charged with the responsibility of hiring, firing and laying off –but they are also charged with the responsibility of making sure the very best individuals on their team stay happy and motivated. Happy and motivated individuals produce a much higher quality work-product (no matter what your role), even when also dealing with a department that is disappearing around you.

So, create a list of everything that you desire to keep yourself a motivated and productive member of the team. That could include obvious things such as ‘more money’, better responsibilities or a better desk or office location –now that there seems to be openings all around you. But it could also include wish-list items like more vacation time and title changes.

If you feel that they cannot offer you more salary, why not let them see some understanding (which will be appreciated) mixed with firm disappointment (which would be expected) and then tell them that if they cannot raise your salary, then you need the next-level title. You said in your email that you are a senior designer in a department that was larger –that used to be headed up by an art director. Now, all are gone and you are there doing all of the work. It seems to me that you would be able to ask for what you ‘need’ –especially if it does not cost them anything additional right now.

Certainly test and see if there are funds for a raise, but if you feel that there are not, try what I suggested. Here’s how it might go:

Let them see some understanding for their financial situation, mixed with firm disappointment –because you have financial needs too. Give them a long pause after showing the dissapointment. Look them in the eye and say with determination, “Well… if you cannot raise my salary, then I need to have the art director title.” Then hold your reaction firm (don’t let anything show!).

Remember, they have kept you because you provide something that others did not. Though you must be the judge as to whether they are reasonable people or not, it’s not likely that they would do anything negative simply because you asked. That’s a common mistake that individuals make, they fail to ask. But, if we don’t ask, we will rarely get, so ask! And be sure to ask in a way that provides some solution to everyone involved. In this case, they will get to keep payroll from increasing (a great benefit to them) in return for giving something without a specific value to them, but of great value to you.

The next time you are then searching for a new career opportunity, you may be doing so with an art director title on your resume showing your increased capabilities and responsibilities.

Prepare for your meeting and make it a win-win for everyone.

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

How to Get Hired If You are Older? …

read-more-only

Q: I’m an older worker and I find myself looking for a new job and wonder: How to Get Hired If You are Older?

-signed, I’ve Got Experience!

There’s no getting around it: this is a tough job market. The candidate pool of talent has expanded exponentially and that is leaving many wondering how they can compete. I had a similar question from an audience member at one of the seminars that I teach. This individual’s concern was ‘how to I compete and get noticed when I seem to be competing with 20-somethings?’ Well, in defense of 20-somethings, I think there’s a time, place and a position for each person’s experience –and that thought really leads to us to the answer.

It’s normal to be looking over our shoulders as we move through our careers, especially as we see hungry up-and-comers beginning to compete for the positions that we may be after. Of course, it’s competition that generally makes everything better, less expensive, and in many cases it can increase service levels as businesses compete for our purchases.

But in employment, competition can make us nervous and lead us to focus on the wrong items, such as age. I’m not so naive to think that agism doesn’t go on in hiring practices, though it should not. But any company worth working for will be much more focused on what each individual can bring to the company, should they be hired.

My recommendation is to put this concern up on the shelf and out of your way. It distracts us from truly going after, and attaining, our real goal. Choose instead to have confidence in the unique accomplishments that you can offer with your experience, and be well prepared to let them know why you are the very best choice for the role.

It can be challenging to put such a concern aside and focus instead on our value, so here’s a simple exercise that can help you get ready to ‘sell’ yourself and your capabilities during your next interview.

––––––––––––––––

Exercise:

Think of the position that you are pursuing, and what the role’s contribution to the company can be –when it’s performed at its best. Now imagine the 3 ‘best’ candidates that you can think of for that role. Those individuals are the people you are competing against to get this career opportunity. Those are the individuals that you need to be ‘more valuable’ than in order to be chosen for the opportunity.

Now, write down all of the reasons why the manager should hire you over those other 3 candidates that they are going to consider. Be very specific and site examples of what you have been able to accomplish for your prior employers.

––––––––––––––––

This simple exercise may have a number of results. You may decide that you are going after a position that you cannot compete for effectively –and that may be a positive outcome in helping you refocus on positions where you can truly succeed.

This exercise can also help you understand in clear terms why you are the very best individual for the role, and how to persuade the manager to come to the same conclusion after you present your points, accomplishments and how you will create an impact for the company –once you are in that role.

Our ego and confidence may take hits from a number of directions when we find ourselves looking for our next career step. Be sure that we are not the ones holding ourselves back and be ready to trumpet your value and contributions. Then your confidence and abilities will not likely go unnoticed.

John Crant

PS: To ‘win’ the roles that you are after, be sure you know all the secrets of how to get noticed. That includes having a resume that properly sells your abilities, being truly prepared for the interview process, and understanding how to avoid the many traps along the way –including those in the HR department.

Copyright © 2009 by John Crant

Check out my book for much more:

Self-Recruiter®

Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &

Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

How to focus your Job Hunting energy and FOLLOW UP!

read-more-only

Question:

I have so much going on in my job search activities… I feel like I have little energy and motivation left for follow up on my activities and fear that I’m not being effective. Help!

-signed, Lost in the Minutia

I speak with many individuals that are in the same boat as you are in, as part of the series that I teach on Job Search & making the changes necessary on your Resume in order to get truly noticed. Let’s face the reality: there are many more people ‘on the market’ right now than there are jobs available. That’s a difficult reality to accept, so I say, ‘don’t accept it’ –and choose to get out of line and do something different. You may be a great candidate, with a great background, but if you go unnoticed, how will you get that offer for your next career challenge, rather than the next person in line?

I teach a class titled Organizing & Managing Your Job Search. In it, I share a complete system to track and manage your job search efforts, including your follow-up activities, to be sure that nothing ‘falls by the weigh-side’. It does take real effort to discover the potential positions for which we wish to be considered. It takes even more effort to get ourselves ‘noticed’ –so that we can really be in contention for those roles that we are going after. And that takes meticulous follow-up along with a plan to ‘market yourself’ for that opportunity –not simply clicking-and-sending to an HR ad on the Internet.

Your follow-up activities and the steps that you take once you have applied for a position can help shine a light on you as the best choice for the role. Or that light can focus in on someone else because of the steps that they take and their focus on follow-up efforts.

On my website, go to the Downloads page and you can download a complete system to help you manager, track and follow-up on each step of your job search. It’s free. The organization and management that the system will bring to your job hunting activities will help you to stay motivated and focused so that you are less likely to go unnoticed for that choice role you may be after. That is the surest way to increase your odds of success in your search for your next great career challenge.

I hope you don’t forget to follow-up on this…

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

How to Make Your Resume Work for You!

read-more-only

How to Make Your Resume Work for You!

Your resume should be doing a lot of work for you. Many people have resumes that grow and grow over time. That may seem okay, as we do add more capability and expertise to our list of skills that we are ‘selling’ when we are looking for a new job or a new career. But over time, your resume can grow more ineffective -as you add in more and more.

It’s natural, especially in these days of harder economic times, to want to include everything that may catch the eye of ‘someone’ that may have a need – and hopefully will choose to call us in for an interview. But the ‘everything + the kitchen sink’ approach is not one that you should be using on your resume.

Let’s revisit what we think a ‘Resume’ is. If we look in the dictionary, that may not help us. One listing that I saw simply said, “1. a curriculum vitae. 2. a summary.” Okay, but that’s not much of a help or a direction to follow.

A Resume:

What is it? It is, and should be, a simple ‘Sales Sheet’ on a hot product (you!) for which you want to help create ‘desire’.

The key word here is simple. It truly needs to be just a single page in most every case. And the information you do choose to include, needs to be valuable to the reader and be very easily ‘absorbed’ within just a few seconds (really, within just 3 to 5 seconds of ‘look time’). So, be sure to do extra work on your formatting.

Things like your address, phone number and hobbies are not really important. Dump the hobbies and make your contact info very small – they will find that information if they want to call you in. Focus the value of your resume on your contributions and accomplishments that should jump off the page. Those are items that they may be looking at, and then imagining, how you can bring those type of accomplishments to their team -should they choose to hire you.

Check out my new Resume Renovation classes (free to attend) & also use my step-by-step guide:

Self-Recruiter®

Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &

Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.

I hear it’s widely available and very helpful.

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
Copyright © 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

Get a New Job Faster! Manage Your Job Search.

read-more-only

How to Achieve Your Goals for Your Job Hunt

Taking on any tough project can be a daunting task, without the proper help. Before long, we are overwhelmed and dropping pieces of our important project here and there. Our follow-up gets lost. Entire areas that should be in focus get moved to a back-burner, and then forgotten. Soon, we have fallen into a rut of doing the same limited activities, over and over again, with less and less of the results for which we are looking.

Don’t beat yourself up too much, but do take control and action, so that your dreams do not fall by the weigh-side. These are certainly not the times where you should just ‘leave it to chance’. Understand your goals. Get a good system in place for managing your Job Search goals and activities, and then follow up on every single detail.

There’s a lot to think about and this is where we usually start to be overwhelmed. Resumes to send out. Calls to potential managers to make (yes, call the hiring manager!). Your personal network to build and ‘work’ for opportunities. Interviews to plan for – what will your interview strategy be? Or will you just go in and interview, and hope that they will choose you?

All of these activities, and more, need a strategy in order to be effective. They need to be tracked and followed up on. And I didn’t even talk about managing your search activities for discovering open jobs yet – ones that you might choose to go after.

Without a detailed plan, and set goals for that plan, it’s not very likely that you will achieve your goals. Join me for my new Organizing and Managing Your Job Search class. It’s free and very helpful in keeping you on track toward reaching for your next career opportunity.

You can also download a free Guide to Organizing Your Job Search, right on my site at SelfRecruiter.com

Get out of the ditch and back on the road toward success!

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

I came in 2nd Place, Now What?

read-more-only

Question:

I just came in 2nd place, after a three month interview process, and I feel like it’s all a loss. Is there anything that I should do?

– Signed, At a Loss

It can be very trying and difficult for our ego to get all the way through a company’s hiring process, only to find out that you were not the one selected. But, don’t let your disappointment let the real value get away.

First, I have to say, “Congratulations!” That may sound strange in response to you ‘not getting the job’, but you did accomplish quite a bit, based on what you had recounted for me in your email. The hardest part, when facing a major setback like not getting the offer, is to see the real value and accomplishments that you have gathered along the way.

In your longer message, you noted that there had been many hundreds of people, who had been ‘considered’ qualified that had applied for the role (and likely many, many more that had sent in resumes, but may not have had the right background for the position). Let’s go over your basic achievements in this interview process, as it’s very important to log and track your successes along side of your missed opportunities, so that every new interview process can be even better and lead toward the success that you desire. You had noted that you had five in-person rounds of interviews and one telephone pre-screen call. By itself, that’s quite a chance to discuss your value with others in your industry. That also means that you had ‘won’ every one of those rounds, and made it all the way to the final round, beating out many other potential rivals. If that’s not enough of a reason to celebrate, let’s look for the other value pieces.

You had opportunities (from your email to me) to meet and network with a VP, two Directors, a Manager and several team members, not to mention a couple of important gate-keepers. That’s a lot of industry contacts that will likely remember you, as you did win, all the way to the final round. You told me that you did the proper follow-up and thank you notes for each person. You are now ready to take another important step: ‘link’ with all of those individuals, after-the-fact, to keep your network growing. Using websites like LinkedIn to reach out to these individuals afterword will reinforce your value in their minds, and continue to expand your industry contacts.

We all feel like just ‘letting it go’ after we did not get chosen, but they did see your value or they would not have kept bringing you back. So, take a slice of humble-pie and reach out and ask them to join your professional network on LinkedIn. That way, you gain their contacts (and their contacts contacts) and have already received a great return on your invested time.It will also highlight you as a true professional in their minds. And you never know how that ‘new-hire’ will work out for them (or not), and they may come knocking again. Either way, you’ve formed good connections, any one of whom will likely speak well of you to colleagues of theirs at different companies and to those ‘friends of friends’ who may have a need for talent as well.

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

How Long Does an Interview Process Take?

read-more-only

Question:

How long should my Interview Process Take?

– Signed, Tired of Waiting

 

Interview processes vary widely, but let’s start by looking at the average length of time an interview process takes, from the company’s perspective. The average length of time for a company to start and fully complete the hiring process for any one position is usually between 6 to 8 weeks, in a normal market. That timer starts from the moment several key factors have been met, not from the date they place their first ad.

Before the timer can be considered to have ‘started’, the manager must:

1.Have decided that there is a need to hire now.

2.Have the budget for the position or potential hire approved.

3.Be ready to make an offer and hire (and not be window

shopping), if they find the right individual to add to the team.

Of course, this is not a normal market,

and the process could take a number of weeks longer than normal.

There are budget and hiring ‘freezes’ at every turn, and many factors can pop up in the middle of a sincere attempt at hiring that cause unforeseen delays in the decision-process. You may find companies that are moving faster than expected, but very likely you will find most may be taking longer than usual due to the turmoil in the market.

Also, the sheer volume of individuals going after each position can weigh down a process, if the manager or company does not define and control it well. Think about it for a moment: if the manager is having difficulty deciding whom to add to the team, and more and more ‘resumes’ are arriving each day… When will they cut off the search and choose someone?

It’s your job in the process to make sure that you are not ‘getting lost’ in all of the white noise created by any hiring process.

• How will you make yourself, your ‘brand’, stand out against, and above all others?

• Did you re-work your resume and make the cuts necessary so that it is much more effective at telling your story of accomplishments?

• Did you prepare all of your self-marketing materials to present your best value to the company?

• Did you reach out directly to the boss (the hiring manager), or did you just ‘get in line’ with the numerous others lining up at the HR department?

• Did you solve potential problems ‘in advance’, after each interview, with a Thank You note geared toward removing any potential issues from their mind?

• Did you remember to make yourself memorable at every step, so that they might be thinking of you, when they make that final choice?

Be patient – if you have done all that you needed to do to get noticed – and while waiting, utilize the time to make your efforts worthwhile by going after several top opportunities with your well-developed ‘secrets’ that get you noticed. That way, you may have more than one option and offer to consider.

Just Don’t Be… Waiting!

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

Fine. Until the Bell Tolls for Thee.

read-more-only

Question:

I just got my notice and I feel overwhelmed. I’m not sure where to start.

– Signed, Living in Distress

It can be overwhelming when we seem to be just below a tall wave that is crashing over top of us. Will we survive, take a thrashing, or will we drown? The first thing you need to do is to Get Over It (see my earlier column on getting over a layoff). Once you have accepted and come to terms with your new situation, get right to work! It can be a self-fulfilling prophesy of missed opportunities when we just give up, rather than fight on, when we find ourselves in a tough position.

You need to be smart and effective with your efforts, or those efforts may go unnoticed. Develop a solid plan with strategic outreach to potential opportunities that you see and not just to HR. Just don’t ‘send in a resume’, because that’s what everyone is doing these days and your message or resume will likely get lost in all the white noise generated by the hiring process. You have to take a real look at yourself and your assets, as I have guided others to do in my book, Self-Recruiter® Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter & Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.

Besides getting all of your value pieces ready to present and to sell to a hiring manager, you need a system, or to develop a method to be sure you have a real in-depth plan of action to find and win that right next position for yourself. That includes understanding how to really work your network, or how to develop one for yourself if you are just getting started in networking.

Check out many of the useful forms on my site (SelfRecruiter.com, click on Forms & Downloads) that can help maximize your efforts. Get busy now and you can be out interviewing for those desired positions, and by-passing that ever expanding waiting line that is forming at the HR department. Read much more about it in my book.

Good luck on getting your plan of action into gear–

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

© John Crant

Share:
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
© 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com

As Quoted by The Wall Street Journal’s Career Website, FINS.com

–––––

It’s difficult to effectively focus our job search activities when we are still working for our ‘future’ past employer. But with a proper structure and plan in place, we can be successful with just 1–2 evening hours of efforts per day. Here’s how:

Q: How much time should I spend on my job search each day if I have a full-time job, but searching for a new position?

Naturally, we should spend as much focused time as is possible, but we have to be realistic with what that means. Most of us are struggling these days to keep up with the ever-increasing workload in our current positions. This may leave us feeling trapped and indentured to our current employers, and it leads some companies to take further advantage of their workforce. Anger, frustration and exhaustion can give way to our job search efforts stagnating and losing direction.

The best way to manage a Job Search is to run it like any other Important Project:

1. Set the Goals

2. Review Your Resources (time and energies)

3. Map-out a Strategy

4. Stick to the Plan

But what is possible, and realistic, with the 1–2 evening hours that may be available, after taking care of your other responsibilities, when currently working? It’s really as simple as stepping back and looking at the right activities that drive interaction and response from those you may be interested in engaging with during our job search process.

Q: 3 activities a Job Seeker should do in their Job Search?

The question points us toward the Elements that will become part of a mapped-out Strategy:

1. (Limited) Consistent Searching for new Job Postings / Listings

Time Limit: 30-minutes Daily

While searching for job postings can be the #1 trap that eats up our available time, as many of those postings don’t genuinely represent companies ‘ready to hire’ right now, it’s still an important element of an effective job search. We can limit the damage to our daily plan, by limiting and controlling this activity.

2. Effective Use of LinkedIn: Marketing & Marketing

Time Limit: 45-minutes Daily

Most Job Seekers don’t really understand the power of LinkedIn –or how to harness it.

I recommend 2 marketing approaches for effective LinkedIn Use:

The 1st Marketing effort is to making our Social Media Marketing effective and time-efficient.

Before beginning our daily (time-restricted) activity on LinkedIn, spend an initial 2-hours on a weekend creating a ‘25 Shares’ list. This is basic text document that you can open each time you’d like to ‘Social Media Market’ yourself, allowing you to do a simple copy-and-paste with just a few seconds of invested time.

Create a list of 25 items that you can share that shape perception about you, your place in the industry, and your skill set.

What should you be sharing through your Social Media Marketing?

LINKS for:

– Books on your specialty (that you’ve read / are reading)

– Articles on something related to what you do, your industry or niche

– Industry White Papers that you find on the Internet

– Conferences, Workshops, Events that you attend, or are thinking of attending

– Projects that you are working on (be sure not to violate trade-secrets’ or non-disclosure agreements that you may have signed)

– Anything Else Interesting that shapes perception about you

Once assembled, you can easily open this list 4–6 times per day and copy-and-paste the next item to share in the ‘Share an update’ section of your LinkedIn homepage. Just keep rotating through your list of 25, and then refresh the basic overall list of daily shared items every month. Remember, it’s not about what your connections see, it’s that your updates can land on the home pages of the exponential number of connections that are up to 3-levels away, but still in your larger network (the people in your industry that you do not know yet). You can accomplish significant perception-marketing about you in less that 5-total-minutes per day with this technique.

The 2nd Marketing activity is to ‘Soft Market’ yourself to decision-makers.

When you find companies or jobs that you are interested in from your other job search activities, come to LinkedIn and ‘soft market’ yourself right into the minds of the decision-makers.

Here’s how:

– Make sure your Settings are ‘open and visible’, especially your ‘Profile Views’ setting, which lets you control what others see about you when you visit their profiles (choose to display your picture, headline, and be sure to include your email address and value-positioning as part of your headline, not just your current title).

– Open the Profiles of those individuals that may be in the decision-chain for roles that you would like at the prospective employer you’d like to join. Just by doing this you have arrived on their ‘radar-screen’ as having ‘looked’ at them (as a direct link from their homepages). It’s irresistible, and they are very likely to click on you to see who’s been looking at them (human nature).

– While their profile is open, ‘add them to your network’ with a simple introduction of you as a professional in their niche.

Whether they accept right away or not, it’s another opportunity to get them to look at your profile, which when well-developed, should be a 3-dimensional sales brochure all-about-you that drives the reader to a singular conclusion:

“It’s going to be the best business decision that I make today if I hire this person.”

With the remaining 40-minutes, after the copy-and-paste marketing that you’ll do a number of times per day, use LinkedIn to enhance your communications outreach (noted next, below), you’ll be effectively using LinkedIn at last.

3 (a). Communications: Outreach Directly to Decision-makers

Time Limit: 30-minutes Daily

Now that you’ve opened those decision-makers’ profiles on LinkedIn (for the roles that you desire) and requested to add them to your network, take the next step of emailing or calling them directly.

Reach out and express why you are so interested in them / their organization (it cannot be because you need a job, everyone does), and add to your comments that you, ‘just had to reach out and introduce yourself.’ Make sure to keep it about them, and then link what excites you about them to a skill set or area of value that you would bring to their team.

Now the hard part: ask for a meeting!

It could be as simple as,

“I’d love to meet with you and share more about what I could add to your team. I have an opening on Thursday at 9 a.m., would that work for your schedule?”

Calling and emailing simultaneously is most effective, but you can communicate just by email if you are not ready to call people that you do not know.

Just remember to:

– communicate your excitement

– make it about them before it’s about you

– ask for the meeting

Meetings (better known as interviews!) are crucial to being able to better communicate why you are the ‘best new hire’ that they should consider. Just avoid the use of the word ‘interview’ to better manage expectations and avoid potential roadblocks that can stop a conversation from happening.

3 (b). Communications: Follow-up: Develop a Communications Channel, not Just 1-off Messages

Time Limit: 15-minutes Daily

Your follow-up is a test of will and persistence, and your chance to be seen more clearly when viewed in comparison of all the other potential candidates.

Follow-up also does not mean, “Did you get my resume?” –that’s just not very valuable messaging.

So, follow up with interesting new layers, like sharing an article on their industry, niche, or competitors, and ask them again for a meeting where you’d like to share more. The goal is an ongoing communication channel, not just 1 or 2 messages.

Q: What should Job Seekers to do everyday (or almost everyday) that most people don’t consider as part of their job search strategy?

Read.

No one (really) seems to want to read any more.

Information is the new currency. You have to know what’s ‘going on’ in the area that you want to work. What’s happening in the industry, with the products or services, with this company and its competitors?

I don’t count this in the ‘2-hours’, as we can read at many points and times throughout the day with a few minutes here and there –just replace our natural Web-surfing with reading the right content.

Make a folder on your browser toolbar that has the bookmarks of all the:

– industry trade-paper websites

– associations

– company blogs

– saved Google-news searches of various companies we are interested in

Each few minutes of break that you have throughout the day, use the time to read up on your potential audience.

You have to know what’s ‘going on’ to be engaging to those companies you might like to join.

Q: Is having a set ‘time period’ to conduct a Job Search effective? What are the pitfalls?

Having a set time period can give us the structure to accomplish what may seem daunting by limiting the challenge to the most important tasks.

These steps outlined for a 2-hour job search will help generate discussions and meetings. Those are the basic stepping stones that will lead us to our next successful career step.

The only pitfall to a structured time is if we use that time to waste our energies, rather than focusing in on the items and activities that will generate discussions and meetings.

We have to engage and talk with people to get hired.

Let’s remove our excuses, and focus on the steps that will help us to our next career challenge.

Taking back control for ourselves can be difficult when we are feeling less than confident in our Job Search. Structure, the right steps, and removing the obstacles holding ourselves back is the surest way toward the success waiting in our future.

Let’s Get Started & Take Back Control In Your Job Search

John Crant

Author, Career Coach & Speaker

on Job Search and Career Management

Copyright © 2011 by John Crant

As seen and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, on FINS.com, on CareerBuilder’s CBsalary.com, on The Ladders, in The New York Post, The Huffington Post, in Essence magazine, in CRAIN’S New York Business, on Forbes.com, in amNY, and on CNN, BBC, FOX News, Arise TV – John shares the answers and the concrete steps for success in Job Search.

John is a Featured Speaker at The New York Public Library’s JOB SEARCH CENTRAL, as well as at the YMCA in New York City, and is a Social Media expert for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program.

He speaks at Corporate Events, works with Workforce Development organizations, and teaches both students and alumni with this Self-Recruiter® Series for Colleges and Universities.

My Book:
Self-Recruiter®
Changing the Rules: How to Be Your Own Recruiter &
Ride the Economic Crisis to Your Next Career Challenge.
Copyright © 2009 by John Crant

Also check out my FULL-SERVICE:
• Career Coaching & Mentoring
• LinkedIn Professional Profile Creation / Renovation (Full-Service)
• Resume Renovations (Full-Service)
• Online Lecture Series

Direct: 212-372-9878
john@selfrecruiter.com
www.selfrecruiter.com